159_SS1Cruiser Sales Slide, Touring Sales Climb

Cruiser style motorcycles are everywhere. Whether blacked out, balloon tire Bobbers or bagged and bladed Touring Cruisers, it seems riders in the U.S. love their Cruisers.

In fact, according to Minneapolis-based research firm Power Products Marketing (PPM), Cruisers represent 26% of the market, Touring Cruiser models represent 27% of the market, and Harley-Davidson, with its Cruisers and Tourers, itself holds a 39% share of the overall U.S. motorcycle market.

However, despite their overall popularity, Cruiser sales in 2013 totaled approx. 107,465 units, down -5.5% compared to 2012, down an incredible -69% compared to a sales high point in 2005, and down -66% compared to 2003, according to figures compiled by PPM.

The top 10 best-selling cruisers in the U.S. in 2013 were the H-D Heritage Softail Classic, H-D Iron 883, Yamaha V Star 950 Tourer, H-D Softail Slim, H-D Dyna Street Bob, H-D Sportster 48, H-D Breakout, H-D Dyna Super Glide Custom, H-D Switchback and H-D Dyna Wide Glide.

Sales of Touring motorcycles in 2013 totaled approx. 111,600 units, up 10.5% compared to 2012, still down -20% compared to a sales high point in 2006, but up nearly 7% compared to 2003, according to PPM.

The top 10 best-selling Touring motorcycles in the U.S. in 2013 were the H-D Street Glide, H-D Electra Glide Ultra Ltd., H-D Road Glide Custom, H-D Ultra Classic Electra Glide, H-D Road King, H-D Road Glide Ultra, Honda GL1800 Gold Wing, H-D Electra Glide Classic Anniversary, H-D Road King Classic and Victory Cross Country.

Here we’ve assembled some market information about 10 of the leading suppliers of Cruiser and Touring Cruiser type motorcycles.

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Ducati

Ducati’s Diavel sales in 2013 were up 6% from 2012. Top selling among the five models were the Diavel, Diavel Carbon and Diavel Strada.

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Harley-Davidson

Harley-Davidson models in 2013 represented 13 of the top 20 most-sold motorcycles in the U.S. – insuring the brand’s continued strong market share.

Harley-Davidson in 2013 experienced 3.8% sales growth in the U.S. via sales of about 160,070 units. The top three best-selling models in the U.S. last year – Street Glide, Electra Glide Ultra Ltd. and Road Glide Custom – accounted for 37.1% of the OE’s stateside sales. The company’s top three Cruiser models were the Heritage Softail Classic, Iron 883 and Softail Slim; top Touring Cruiser models were the Street Glide, Electra Glide Ultra Ltd. and Road Glide Custom.

Globally, H-D in 2013 delivered 260,471 units, with Sportsters representing 50,308 units, Custom models representing 102,950 units, and Touring models representing 107,213 units. For 2014, H-D expects to ship 279,000 to 284,000 motorcycles to dealers and distributors worldwide, an approximate 7% to 9% increase from 2013.

The Motor Company’s strongest year in the past decade came in 2007 with the shipment of 330,619 units globally.

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Honda

Honda Cruiser sales in 2013 were down -34% compared to 2012. None of the nine models experienced an uptick. Best-selling Cruisers were the Rebel, Phantom and Fury.

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Indian

Indian’s introductory year with new product had the Vintage model serve as the brand’s best-seller in 2013, followed by the Chieftain and Classic.

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Kawasaki

Kawasaki’s Cruiser motorcycle sales in 2013 were down -25% compared to 2012. Best-selling Cruisers were the Vulcan 900 Custom, Vulcan 900 Classic and Vulcan 900 Classic LT. As with Honda, none of Kawasaki’s Cruiser models experienced sales growth in 2013. 

As for Touring Cruisers: Best-sellers were the Vaquero, Vulcan Voyager and Nomad, each of which experienced a sales decline from 2012 to 2013.

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Moto Guzzi

Moto Guzzi’s California 1400 Custom served as the brand’s third best-selling U.S. model in 2013, following the V7 Stone and V7 Racer. These top three best-selling models accounted for 54.5% of the OE’s total U.S. sales. The brand’s sole Touring Cruiser in 2013 was the new 1400 Touring.

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Suzuki

Suzuki’s Cruiser type motorcycle sales in 2013 were down -9.5% compared to 2012. Sales of Touring Cruisers experienced plummeted -19.5% compared to 2012. Best-selling Cruisers were the S40, M109Z and M90; the M109Z, M90, M50 and C50 all experienced sales growth while sales declined for the S40 and M109R. The best-selling Touring Cruiser was the C50T, more than three times as popular as the C90T.

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Triumph

Triumph’s Cruiser model sales in the U.S. have remained relatively steady at about through 2012 and 2013. Best sellers among the five Cruiser models were the America, Speedmaster and Thunderbird. America and Thunderbird sales shrank while Speedmaster sales grew.

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Victory

Victory experienced 7.7% sales growth in 2013. Victory’s three best-selling models in 2013 were the Cross Country, Cross Country Tour and Vegas 8-Ball. These top three best-selling models accounted for 55.3% of the OE’s total sales. 

Among total sales, Cruiser type model sales were up 5.2%; Touring Cruiser sales were up 9.2%. The brand’s top three Cruiser models were the Vegas 8-Ball, High-Ball and Judge; the brand’s top three Touring Cruisers were the Cross Country, Cross Country Tour and Vision Tour.

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Yamaha

Yamaha in 2013 was the only of the Big Four manufacturers from Japan to have a Cruiser style motorcycle within its top three best-selling models. Yamaha’s Cruiser sales in 2013 grew 9% compared to 2012. The top three Cruiser models were the V Star 950 Tourer, Stryker and V Star; top Touring Cruiser was the sole Venture.


H-D Reinvents Product Approach

H-D in late 2013 introduced its Project Rushmore models and announced the planned delivery of the Street 500 & 750, in March introduced the new Low Rider Dyna powered by the Twin Cam 103 and updated SuperLow 1200T Sportster powered by the 1200cc Evolution V-Twin engine, and in June showed us the Project LiveWire electric concept model.

“In just the last few years, we’ve broadened our reach to serve an increasingly diverse society, as well as reinvented our approach to product development and manufacturing,” said Matt Levatich, President and Chief Operating Officer, Harley-Davidson Motor Company. “This has resulted in cutting-edge products like the recently launched Project Rushmore touring bikes, Harley-Davidson Street 500 and 750 models and this reveal of Project LiveWire.”  

Its clear H-D has needed to reinvent itself. The brand’s “traditional” customer base in 2013 was made up of about 60% Caucasian men aged over 35, a demographic that the Motor Company’s own research shows is likely to shrink in coming years. At the same time, the population of young adults (18-34), Caucasian women, African-Americans and Hispanics is set to increase, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

“We believe our strategy to focus on growth among young adults, women, Hispanics, and African-Americans, as well as our traditional core customer base, lines up extremely well with these population trends,” H-D stated in its year-end report to investors. 

The new focus appears to be working: In 2013, H-D says, U.S. retail sales of new Harley-Davidson motorcycles to “outreach” customers (young adults 18-34, women, African-Americans and Hispanics) grew overall at more than twice the rate of sales to “traditional” customers (Caucasian men, ages 35-plus.)

What were those “outreach” customers buying?

Harley-Davidson in 2013 experienced 3.8% sales growth in the U.S. via sales of about 160,070 units. Sportsters represented about 19.3% of deliveries, Custom models represented 39.5%, and Touring models represented 41.2%. The top three best-selling models in the U.S. last year – Street Glide, Electra Glide Ultra Ltd. and Road Glide Custom – accounted for 37.1% of the OE’s stateside sales.

Lets take a look at a few of the newly introduced models that the Motor Company hopes will keep its business on a growth course.

LowRider

H-D is promoting the LowRider ($14,199) – one of the five-model Dyna family – via its wrinkle black and chrome Twin Cam 103 engine dressing, Six-Speed Cruise Drive, new two-into-one exhaust, custom-like details, chunky mag wheels, and new tank-mounted wrinkle black console with speedo and tach.

The air-cooled, Twin Cam 103 that develops 98.8 ft. lb. at 3,500 rpm features black powder-coated heads and cylinders that are highlighted by machined cooling fin tips and chrome rocker covers.

Up top, it’s all very flashy. There’s the custom details of a wrinkle black paint on the powertrain and fender strut covers, a polished front end, wrinkle black and chrome powertrain and chrome-plated fender strut covers.

Swing a leg over the LowRider’s 26.8-inch seat height (unladen) and you’ll notice ergonomics are dictated by mid-mount foot controls, a unique handlebar riser that provides 2.4” of movement fore and aft, and an innovative seat design, which allows you to select from two riding positions that offer an additional 1.5” of adjustment fore and aft.

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LowRider Specifications

Price: $14,199, Vivid Black / $14,929, Color Option

Engine: 103.1 cu. in. air-cooled V-twin

Fuel System: Electronic Sequential Port Fuel Injection

Bore x Stroke: 3.87 in. x 4.37 in.

Compression Ratio: 9.6:1

Transmission: 6-speed

Primary Drive: Chain

Exhaust: Two-into-one

Wheels: 5-Spoke Cast Aluminum, Black

Front Tire: 100/90 B19 57H

Rear Tire: 160/70 B17 73V

Front Brake: Single disc, fixed four piston 

Rear Brake: Single disc, floating twin piston

Length: 92.3 inches

Seat Height (Unladen): 26.8 inches

Rake: 30.5 degrees

Trail: 5.1 inches

Wheelbase: 64.2 inches

Fuel Capacity: 4.7 gallons

Wet Weight: 666 lbs.

Colors: Vivid Black, Amber Whiskey/Vivid Black, Brilliant Silver/Vivid Black

Amenities: High beam, neutral, low oil pressure, low fuel warning, engine diagnostics and turn signal indicators.

SuperLow 1200T

Developing 70.8 ft. lb. of torque at 3,500 rpm, the SuperLow 1200T ($11,799) is the latest addition to what is now Harley’s six-model family of Sportster bikes. H-D is promoting key features like the rubber-mounted air-cooled Evolution Blockhead with electronic fuel injection, aluminum heads and cylinders; overhauled brake system; adjustable shocks; relocated mid-mount controls; technological advances like closed loop exhaust; and premium styling with gobs of chrome, lockable saddlebags, a quick release windshield and five-spoke wheels.

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SuperLow 1200T Specifications

Price: $11,799, Vivid Black / $12,114, Color Option / $12,334, Two-Tone Option

Engine: 73.4 cu. in. air-cooled Evolution V-twin

Fuel System: Electronic Sequential Port Fuel Injection

Bore x Stroke: 3.5 in. x 3.81 in.

Compression Ratio: 10:1

Transmission: 5-speed

Primary Drive: Chain

Exhaust: Two-into-one

Wheels: 5-Spoke Cast Aluminum, Black/Silver

Front Tire: 120/70 ZR-16 59W

Rear Tire: 150/70 ZR-17 69W

Front Brake: Single disc, dual piston 

Rear Brake: Single disc, dual piston

Length: 87.5 inches

Seat Height (Unladen): 27.6 inches

Rake: 31.1 degrees

Trail: 5.7 inches

Wheelbase: 59.1 inches

Fuel Capacity: 4.5 gallons

Wet Weight: 598 lbs.

Colors: Vivid Black, Candy Orange, Birch White/Midnight Pearl

Amenities: High beam, neutral, low oil pressure, low fuel warning, engine diagnostics and turn signal indicators.

Street 500 & 750

Harley-Davidson says it gathered input from more than 3,000 customers, riders and dealers in more than 10 countries around the world to create the Street platform – the first all-new motorcycle platform from the company in 13 years.

Harley-Davidson promotes the Street 500 and 750 with their new liquid-cooled engine and six-speed transmission, light weight, low seat height, mid-mount controls, light action steering and low speed maneuverability.

Dino Bernacchi, Director U.S. Marketing, Harley-Davidson Motor Company, describes them as “the perfect motorcycle to help introduce the next generation of passionate riders to the amazing experiences and thrills that await them on two wheels.” 

H-D went all Metric on us with these bikes, publicizing the 30 cu. in. engine in the 500 as featuring “494 cubic centimeters of genuine Harley-Davidson V-Twin built to thrive in high temperatures and heavy traffic.”

That last bit is a nod to the powerplant’s liquid cooling. “Liquid-cooling means it maintains temperature and performance,” Harley writes in its promotional literature. “Bring on the stop- and- go traffic. The Street 500 stays cool and ready to respond instantly to your throttle hand.”

Harley says the Street’s 489-lb. wet weight, low center of gravity, 32-inch rake, 60.4-inch wheelbase, 140 series rear tire and 17-inch front wheel are optimized for low speed maneuverability or achieving a 28.5-inch right and left lean angle. Further, those aspects would appear to work in concert with the bike’s narrow waist and 25.7-inch laden (27.9-inch unladen) seat height to help add confidence for newbie riders.

That seat also offers comfortable foot placement atop the slightly forward mid-mount lower controls and a compliant handlebar position that makes it a breeze to turn that front assembly at any speed.

Technically, there is not much difference between the 500 and 750. The Street 500 develops 25 ft.-lb. of torque at 3,500 rpm. The Street 750 differs from the Street 500 in its machined wheels, larger bore size, injector size and output, delivering 44.3 ft. lb. of torque at 4,000 rpm.

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Street 500 Specifications

Price: $7,129, Vivid Black / $7,424, Color Option

Engine: 494cc (30 cu. in.) liquid-cooled 60-degree V-twin

Fuel System: Mikuni Single Port Fuel Injection, 35mm bore

Bore x Stroke: 2.72 in. x 2.6 in.

Compression Ratio: 11:1

Transmission: 6-speed

Exhaust: Two-into-one

Wheels: 7-Spoke Cast Aluminum, Black

Front Tire: 100/80 R17

Rear Tire: 140/75 R15

Front Brake: Single disc, twin piston 

Rear Brake: Single disc, twin piston

Length: 87.6 inches

Seat Height (Unladen): 27.9 inches

Rake: 32 degrees

Trail: 4.5 inches

Wheelbase: 60.4 inches

Fuel Capacity: 3.5 gallons

Wet Weight: 489 lbs.

Colors: Vivid Black, Mysterious Red Sunglo, Black Denim

Amenities: 3.5-inch electronic speedometer; high beam, neutral, low oil pressure, low fuel warning, engine diagnostics and turn signal indicators; fork lock; locking gas cap.

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Street 750 Specifications

Price: $7,829, Vivid Black / $8,124, Color Option

Engine: 749cc (46 cu. in.) liquid-cooled 60-degree V-twin

Fuel System: Mikuni Single Port Fuel Injection, 38mm bore

Bore x Stroke: 3.35 in. x 2.6 in.

Compression Ratio: 11:1

Transmission: 6-speed

Exhaust: Two-into-one

Wheels: 7-spoke cast aluminum, black with
machined highlights

Front Tire: 100/80 R17

Rear Tire: 140/75 R15

Front Brake: Single disc, twin piston 

Rear Brake: Single disc, twin piston

Length: 87.6 inches

Seat Height (Unladen): 27.9 inches

Rake: 32 degrees

Trail: 4.5 inches

Wheelbase: 60.4 inches

Fuel Capacity: 3.5 gallons

Wet Weight: 489 lbs.

Colors: Vivid Black, Mysterious Red Sunglo, Black Denim

Amenities: 3.5-inch electronic speedometer; high beam, neutral, low oil pressure, low fuel warning, engine diagnostics and turn signal indicators; fork lock; locking gas cap.


Project LiveWire

Finally, in June, Harley-Davidson revealed its first electric motorcycle via its Project LiveWire concept model.

“America at its best has always been about reinvention,” said Matt Levatich, President and Chief Operating Officer, Harley-Davidson Motor Company. “And, like America, Harley-Davidson has reinvented itself many times in our history, with customers leading us every step of the way. Project LiveWire is another exciting, customer-led moment in our history.”

While not for sale, Project LiveWire is specifically designed for the purpose of getting insight into rider expectations of an electric Harley-Davidson motorcycle. H-D intends to visit more than 30 dealerships in the U.S. with a couple of dozen of these prototype bikes through 2014 in an effort to get additional feedback from riders and retailers. Longer term plans for retail availability of Project LiveWire will be influenced by feedback from riders along the Project Livewire Experience tour.

Built around what looks to be a crinkle-finish one-piece cast aluminum frame and swingarm, the bike is further outfitted with a solo seat, tapered bars and billet-aluminum under-bar mirrors with integrated turn signals, LED dash, LED headlight, fully adjustable Showa Big Piston upside-down fork and center-mount laydown rear shock, belt final drive,10-spoke wheels, Michelin tires measuring 120/70-18 in front and 180/55-17 in back, a single-disc front brake and what look to be radial brakes in back.

There’s no word on what type of motor or controller power the bike, but H-D says the lithium-ion battery pack develops 74 hp, 52 ft. lbs. of torque and takes about 3.5 hours to charge from a 220-volt outlet. Output? Harley says the LiveWire – the prototypes of which are electronically limited to 95 mph – will attain 60 mph in less than four seconds. Respectable.

Learn more about Harley-Davidsons electric motorcycle at ProjectLiveWire.com


Polaris Throttling Up Victory & Indian

Polaris’ motorcycle business, including Victory and Indian brands, in 2013 grew 12% to account for $220 million, or 6% of the OEM’s sales total of $3.8 billion.

Polaris entered the heavyweight motorcycle market in 1998 with an initial Victory product in the Cruiser segment and in 1999 sold 1,695 units. That was followed in 2000 by a Touring Cruiser model and sales of 2,070 units in 2001. Sales climbed to 3,105 in 2003 and now, a decade later, have tripled. What that translates to is Polaris owning a 2.5% share of the total U.S. market for new motorcycles in 2013.

While product is of course the most important aspect of Polaris’ multifaceted business, the OEM has been focused on instilling lean manufacturing principles that cut wasted time, energy and space in getting that product from the production floor onto dealer floors and in your garage. 

“Historically, motorcycle dealers have ordered once a year, resulting in fewer options for customers and potentially excess inventory for dealers,” Polaris CEO Scott Wine noted in a 2013 year-end brief to investors. “So we implemented lean manufacturing principles that allow for unprecedented daily dealer orders. Through our Retail Flow Management (RFM) program, Victory dealers can better match inventory and orders to customer demand – getting bikes delivered in about 15 days versus more than 100.”

Victory

Victory in 2013 experienced 7.7% sales growth via six Baggers, seven Cruisers and two Touring models. Victory’s three best-selling models in 2013 were the Cross Country, Cross Country Tour and Vegas 8-Ball. These top three best-selling models accounted for 55.3% of the OE’s total sales. 

Among total sales, Cruiser type model sales were up 5.2%; Touring Cruiser sales were up 9.2%. The brand’s top three Cruiser models were the Vegas 8-Ball, High-Ball and Judge; the brand’s top three Touring Cruisers were the Cross Country, Cross Country Tour and Vision Tour.

New to the Victory stable this year is the Gunner ($12,999), described as a “bobber style” bike that joins the Vegas, High-Ball, Judge, Hammer, Boardwalk and Jackpot in the brand’s Cruiser offerings. Victory is marketing the Gunner by promoting its 106 cu. in. Freedom V-Twin delivering 110 ft. lb. of torque, six-speed transmission featuring a true overdrive, 24-spoke cast aluminum wheels, 25-inch high solo saddle, relaxed ergonomics, two-tone coloring, and the availability of a multitude of accessories.

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Gunner Specifications

Price: $12,999

Engine: 106 cu. in. 50-degree air/oil-cooled V-twin

Fuel System: Electronic fuel injection, dual 45mm

Bore x Stroke: 101 x 108mm

Compression Ratio: 9.4:1

Transmission: 6-speed, overdrive

Clutch: Wet, multi-plate

Final Drive: Carbon fiber reinforced belt

Exhaust: Staggered, slash-cut dual exhaust with crossover

Wheels: 24-spoke, 16-inch cast aluminum

Front Suspension: 43mm conventional telescopic fork

Rear Suspension: Single mono-tube gas shock,
preload adjustable

Front Tire: Dunlop 130/90 B16 67H

Rear Tire: Dunlop 140/90 B16 77H

Front Brake: Single 300mm disc with four-piston caliper

Rear Brake: Single 300mm disc with two-piston caliper

Length: 93.4 inches

Seat Height (Unladen): 25 inches

Rake: 32 degrees

Wheelbase: 64.8 inches

Fuel Capacity: 4.5 gallons

Dry Weight: 660 lbs.

Colors: Suede Titanium Metallic with graphics

Amenities: High beam, neutral, low oil pressure, low fuel warning, engine diagnostics and turn signal indicators.


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Indian’s introductory year with new product had the Vintage model serve as the brand’s best-seller in 2013, followed by the Chieftain and Classic.

“To tap the vast potential of Indian Motorcycle, we’re making the iconic brand synonymous with craftsmanship,” Wine said. “We’re combining Indian’s historic styling craftsmanship with Polaris’ cutting-edge technical expertise and making premium features standard so Indian bikes represent a compelling value.”

Some industry pundits believe Indian will be retailing five figures worth of units within the next couple of years. That’s a tall order, as the brand would have to move more than six times as many bikes than it did in 2013.

Indian plans to unveil its 2015 models in Sturgis, Aug. 2, offering hands-on product demonstrations, apparel sales, an accessory display and more – including the chance to win a 2015 model year bike. Look for the introduction of a smaller displacement model – the Scout, perhaps – to join the initial three models.


Go West, To Sturgis

It’s August, and for many Minnesota riders that means aiming their motorcycle’s front wheel west and making the 600-mile pilgrimage to Sturgis.

The 74th Annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally takes place Aug. 4-10.

Event organizers say the Rally in 2013 attracted an estimated 467,338 people, up 4.7% compared to attendance in 2012. Incredible, considering the small town has a population of only about 7,000 residents. 

Factors used to determine the annually estimated attendance are the Department of Transportation traffic count, Mount Rushmore traffic count, S.D. sales tax collected, and tons of garbage hauled.

According to Department of Transportation traffic counts taken throughout the week at the entrances to Sturgis, total traffic entering Sturgis has wavered dramatically over the past 10 years, with tallies numbering 605,140 in 2003, 394,009 in 2009, 415,367 in 2011, and 391,372 in 2013.

All of those people spend money. Sturgis Motorcycle Rally provides significant revenue for the City of Sturgis as well as the state of S.D. each year. The taxable sales within city limits, including the 734 vendors licensed in 2013, add up to an estimated $12 million. The total 2013 revenue for the City of Sturgis is estimated to be $1,061,818, not including city or state tax collected.

The first Sturgis Motorcycle Rally was held in 1938, organized by Pappy Hoel and his wife Pearl, and started out as a small gathering of hill-climbers. As you’re likely aware, it’s now the largest motorcycle rally in the world. 

For more information, visit www.sturgismotorcyclerally.com


159_HD_MuseumFeel the Rumble of History’ at the H-D Museum

By B.P. Goebel

As a major player since the dawn of the motorcycle, Harley-Davidson has grown up with motorcycling. The Harley-Davidson Museum, opened in 2008 and located in downtown Milwaukee, chronicles its very earliest days to the present, chronicling the company’s impact on worldwide motorcycle culture in an exciting multi-media format.

Interesting and beautiful enough that even non-bikers will enjoy it, the museum is designed in great enough depth that it will keep the attention of even the most avid and jaded motorcycle fans. Ardent fans of both motorcycles and history may not be able to contain themselves.

The museum is curated beautifully. The execution is also art; lighting, placement, industrial architecture, displays, angles, colors, textures, all are beautiful and well thought out. Even the floor has history – it was the shop floor brought over from the original factory. Far from being a stuffy art museum, the whole exhibit remains accessible. Early Faithful indoctrination is welcomed as the whole museum is truly kid friendly.

Nut and bolt checkers can rejoice, as the museum is home to the largest collection of unrestored Harley’s in the world. The bikes chosen for display are some of the most significant bikes in Harley-Davidson’s storied past. Rare stuff abounds. Rare bikes. Rare artifacts. Rare memorabilia. One of the many interesting exhibits is the interactive engine configuration area. Always get your Knuckle Heads and Pan Heads mixed? Visit the Engine Wall display. The Boardtracker room really makes you think about our motorcycle past and our relation to it. The exquisite tank exhibit would not be out of place in any art museum. The engineering/prototype exhibit gives a great glimpse into some of the realities involved in bringing a motorcycle to market. The Celebration Wall is awe inspiring in an emotional/historical context. There are helpful and knowledgeable ushers hovering around to answer questions.

The museum is the current home to just a fraction of the historical treasures that Harley-Davidson keeps in its archival vaults. Every few months the museum is mixed up a little with changing exhibits and special events.

On the shore of Lake Michigan, the site has beautiful views of the Milwaukee skyline and an enthralling 18 ft. bronze hill climber motorcycle sculpture by famed motorcycle artist/sculptor/customizer Jeff Decker. Should you and your significant other want your wedding reception on the 20-acre campus, that can be arranged. On site is a dedicated restaurant that offers well-executed choices at fair prices. Of course, also on site, exclusive Official Harley-Davidson Museum merchandise is offered.

The museum is open daily 9am-5pm May through September, and 10am to 6pm October through April. Admission is $18 for ages 18-64, $12 for seniors and military, $10 for ages 5-17, and free to children under 5 years of age.

As a destination, Milwaukee has much to offer in addition to the museum, and beer. The museum is a stones throw from a world-class art museam, lively lakeshore, many options for lodging and a bustling nightlife. To really get yourself in the mindset, go see the Milwaukee Museum’s “Street’s of Old Milwaukee” exhibit first. The exhibit is a re-creation of Milwaukee at the turn of the century-right before motorcycles hit the streets. The H-D Museum picks up beautifully from there.

Visit H-DMuseum.com to learn more.


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H-D Recalls More Than 66,000 Tourers

Harley-Davidson last month launched a recall of 66,421 model year 2014 ABS-equipped Touring and CVO Touring motorcycles because the bikes may have been assembled with the front brake line positioned so that it can be pinched between the fuel tank and frame causing the front brake fluid pressure to increase.

Models include the FLHTK, FLHTKSE, FLHTKSHRINE, FLHTCU, FLHTCUTC, FLHTP, FLHX, FLHXS, FLHXSHRINE, FLHR, FLHRC, FLHP, and FLHRSE. The bikes were manufactured July 1, 2013, through May 7, 2014.

A pinched brake line will increase the front brake fluid pressure, possibly resulting in a front wheel lock-up.

H-D said it would notify owners, and dealers would inspect the motorcycles for brake line damage and replace the damaged lines as necessary. Dealers also would be asked to install one or two cable straps to properly prevent the line from being pinched in the future.

This isn’t the first recall for seven of these models. In October 2013, H-D recalled 29,046 of its 2014 Touring and CVO motorcycles for a clutch master cylinder that may allow air into the clutch system. Additionally, the motorcycles may have been assembled with an incorrect clutch release plate.

MMM

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